5 Eye Conditions that Require Prompt Medical Treatment During the Holidays

The holiday season is such a busy time, and when accidents happen, we often take a “wait and see” approach; now this strategy may work for some medical issues during this busy time, but eye problems need to be evaluated right away. Delaying treatment for injuries, infections and sudden vision changes can result in vision loss. Sometimes, patients aren’t sure when it’s necessary to see their Ophthalmologist. In the Triangle, Dr. Beth R. Friedland has more than 30 years of experience handling a variety eye conditions. Dr. Friedland and her staff at Park Ophthalmology prepared an easy-to-remember list of times to call the office for treatment.

These five situations require quick attention by an eye health professional:

  • Foreign objects: It’s probably obvious that any time a foreign object is lodged in an eye, the object needs to be removed promptly by a doctor. Those whose work or hobbies include the risk of flying particles of wood, metal or glass are especially at risk. Wearing protective goggles can eliminate most of this risk.
  • Injuries: Athletes are particularly at risk of impact injuries to their eyes. Getting hit by a ball or another player can cause injuries severe enough to damage vision. The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends a visit to an eye health profession for even seemingly minor eye trauma. Putting off treatment at Christmas or any time of year could cause the initial injury to worsen and create more damage.
  • Chemical exposure: Many household substances people use during this busy time are bad for their eyes. Bleach, ammonia, drain cleaners and anything containing lye can burn the cornea and possibly cause permanent impairment. Even though flushing with clear water will remove the chemical, a visit to Dr. Friedland is needed to check for any lasting harm.
  • Infection: Conjunctivitis, or “pink eye,” is the most common eye infection, and is very common during the holiday season. The condition sometimes will clear up on its own, but medical treatment will ease symptoms and quickly end the infection. Conjunctivitis also can be very contagious, so it’s important to get prompt treatment to prevent passing it on to family members.
  • Sudden vision changes: Sudden changes to vision can indicate serious problems, such as a detached retina, stroke or acute glaucoma. No one should assume that sudden blurriness or clouded vision will resolve itself. A prompt medical exam can help prevent permanent vision loss.

Don’t delay this holiday season. Call Park Ophthalmology immediately if anyone suffers from any of the listed conditions. Also, don’t delay an annual eye exam. Call Dr. Friedland’s office today to schedule an appointment.

Happy Holidays, Merry Christmas and Happy Hanukkah to all!

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article about the holiday season is intended solely for informational purposes and is not offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: freedigitalphotos/blackzheep

 

 

 

 

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4 Critical Facts Every Triangle Parent Should Know About Children’s Vision

Good vision is important throughout life. Children often learn about their world with their eyes!  Triangle parents can ensure their children have the best possible vision by learning about protecting against eye injuries and how to be alert to possible vision problems. Dr. Beth R. Friedland treats patients of all ages and has a particular interest in pediatric ophthalmology, so she is the perfect doctor for parents in the Raleigh Durham area looking for an eye health professional. To aid parents’ understanding of eye health,  Park Ophthalmology has compiled four important facts about childhood vision.

All parents should be aware of the following four facts about children’s eye health:

  • Toys: Toy manufacturers have made great strides in making their products safer for children. Nevertheless, about 11,000 toy-related eye injuries happen to children each year, according to Prevent Blindness America. Many of these injuries can be prevented with proper adult supervision and by making sure the toys are age-appropriate.
  • Sports: Sports account for a staggering 100,000 physician visits annually for eye injuries in school-aged children. In many sports, players are not required to wear protective goggles or eyewear, yet this simple practice could prevent many injuries.
  • Vision correction: Sometimes trouble in school results from vision problems. Children with headaches, eye pain, trouble seeing the blackboard, difficulty paying attention and blurry or double vision should have their eyes checked. Prescription eyeglasses or contacts can correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism so the child can succeed in school.
  • Eye health: Parents can take important steps to help children maintain optimal eye health. In addition to regular examinations for refractive issues, parents should also ensure that their children know the appropriate ways to use toys and other items that can cause injuries. When children begin to play sports, parents can make sure their children wear polycarbonate eye protection, which will not interfere with their young athlete’s vision. Finally, a diet that includes fish, eggs, dairy products, vegetables such as carrots and kale, seeds and nuts provides many nutrients that eyes need to stay healthy.

Concerned about your youngster’s vision? Call Park Ophthalmology today to schedule an appointment with Dr. Friedland. She’ll help you understand what you can do to protect your child’s vision.

Everyone at Park Ophthalmology wishes all a Happy and Prosperous Holiday Season! 

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

 

 

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5 Important Facts about Eye Injuries Every Thanksgiving

It’s logical to assume that most eye injuries occur to those in dangerous professions or certain sports. Surprisingly, nearly half of all eye injuries take place at home, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Sadly, there are a number of accidents on Thanksgiving Day that involve the eyes and more. In the Triangle, Dr. Beth R. Friedland is well-versed in treatments for eye injuries, but she prefers that her patients take precautions this holiday season to prevent damage to their eyes.

Park Ophthalmology has compiled five realities about common risks and eye risk:

  • Dangerous holiday kitchens: Grease shields should be used over pans when there’s a risk of hot spattering grease. Also, anyone who has touched their eyes after cutting a hot pepper knows the sting and burning sensation caused by capsaicin oil, the same stuff used to make pepper spray. Revelers can even be struck in the eye by a champagne cork that explodes from the bottle.
  • Home projects: Cleaning the property for holiday guests is usually a rush assignment. Yard tools such as power hedge trimmers, lawnmowers and weed-eaters all can launch debris into the air. Drilling or hammering screws or nails into walls can also loosen material and send debris flying.
  • House cleaning: Oven cleaners, drain openers, and general household cleaners are often caustic and dangerous for the eyes. Common household products cause 125,000 eye injuries annually in the United States.
  • Read the directions: One of the easiest ways to prevent eye injuries is to read directions that come with new tools, cleaning products and appliances. There is less chance of injury when products are used as intended with adherence to the manufacturer’s warnings.
  • Use goggles for safety this holiday season: Every household should have at least one pair of safety goggles handy. These should be eyewear that carries an ANSI-approved label. This means the goggles meet the standards for eye protection set out by the American National Standards Institute.

Find out more about avoiding eye injuries with an appointment at Park Ophthalmology. Beth R, Friedland MD and her professional staff have a wealth of knowledge about eye health and eye care. Contact the office today and make an appointment for a yearly exam. If new to the Triangle, Dr. Friedland is accepting new patients.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care during Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah, and the holiday season is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

 

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

 

 

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5 Simple Facts the Triangle Needs to Know about Contact Lenses

Contact lenses continue to be one of the most popular vision choices for many Triangle residents. Yet there are important facts about contact lenses that patients should understand when they are choosing between eyeglasses and contacts. Raleigh and Durham patients know an annual eye exam with Dr. Beth R. Friedland at Park Ophthalmology will determine the degree of correction a patient needs, but patients are encouraged to explore their personal options with both glasses and contacts. Many people have discovered that they prefer both the physical appearance of contacts and the ability to leave eyeglasses behind.

Park Ophthalmology patients considering contacts should understand these five simple facts:

  • Correction: Both glasses and contacts can provide proper visual correction for most patients. Because contacts sit directly on the eyes, they provide improved peripheral vision, something not available with glasses. Advances in contact lens design also mean that many new products are available. Even those who need bifocals or who have astigmatism have the option of wearing contacts.
  • Comfort: Some Triangle patients are reluctant to try contacts because they’ve heard they are uncomfortable. Our Park Ophthalmology patients find that it takes only a short time to adjust, and soon forget they’re wearing contacts.
  • Exceptions: The American Academic of Ophthalmology provides some important guidelines about contact lens use. Contacts are not recommended for those who have frequent eye infections, severe allergies or dry eye that is resistant to treatment. Also, those who work in very dusty environments should avoid wearing contacts.
  • Care: When not properly cleaned and cared for, contacts can lead to eye infections. Lens users should always follow their doctor’s instructions about how to clean and store contacts. Contacts can warp with use, so it’s important to change them as instructed.
  • Cost: In some situations, it will be less expensive to order a pair of glasses than to keep refilling a contact prescription. Just as with eyeglasses, there is a wide range in cost for contacts, depending on the type required. Patients can expect to spend more for contacts than eyeglasses, but the choice belongs to the patient. Do what is best. 

Considering switching from glasses to contacts? Schedule an appointment at Park Ophthalmology today to discover all the options. We are the home for eye care in the Triangle.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and Park Ophthalmology laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

 

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: freedigitalphotos  marin

 

 

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4 Essential Cataract Facts Every Patient Should Know, from Park Ophthalmology

Many Triangle residents diagnosed with cataracts turn for guidance to Dr. Beth R. Friedland and Park Ophthalmology. Unfortunately, cataracts are a leading cause of vision loss among adults older than 40, and one of the main causes of blindness in the world. The good news is that most people diagnosed with cataracts can be treated successfully with surgery. Dr. Friedland has a specialized interest in ocular gerontology (treatment of the elderly) and she has decades of experience in eye surgery. Here are some basic facts that every cataract patient should know about the condition and its treatment.

Park Ophthalmology presents four fundamentals to help patients understand cataracts: 

  • Causes: A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens, caused by the breakdown of proteins. Aging is the primary cause, with 60 to 90 percent of those older than 65 affected. Circumstances that increase the risk for cataracts include smoking, heavy drinking, obesity, high blood pressure, previous eye injuries, family history, too much UV light (sun) exposure, diabetes and exposure to radiation from x-rays and cancer treatments.
  • Symptoms: Typical signs of cataracts include a fuzziness or cloudiness in vision, sensitivity to light or glare, seeing colors as washed out or faded and seeing halos around lights. A frequent need to change lens prescriptions could also be a sign of cataracts. An ophthalmologist will be able to diagnose cataracts during an exam while the eyes are dilated.
  • Treatments: Cataract surgery involves the removal of the clouded lens and replacement with an artificial lens. The surgery is an outpatient procedure during which the eye is numbed and the surgeon makes small incisions near the edge of the cornea to reach the lens. The patient will be awake during the procedure but will only notice light and movement, not the specifics of the surgery itself. The patient goes home the same day.
  • Outcomes: With a new artificial lens in place, patients experience much improved vision. Some patients notice improvement the day after surgery; others might have to wait two weeks to a month for clear vision to return. Occasionally, cloudy vision returns after a few months, but this is easily remedied with a laser procedure.

When a patient is affected by cataracts, don’t delay diagnosis and treatment. The sooner help is found, the quickly normal vision can return.

Call Park Ophthalmology today to schedule an appointment with Dr. Friedland.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the cataracts is brought to North Carolina by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

 

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

 

 

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3 Important Reasons Triangle Residents Choose Park Ophthalmology

Vision is the key sense that humans use to experience the world. As the year turns to autumn, Triangle residents enjoy the beauty of maple trees, flowering dogwoods, and white oaks as they turn into a kaleidoscope of oranges, reds, tans, and yellows. Dr. Beth R. Friedland, who has been in practice in the Triangle for more than 30 years, wants all of her patients to experience the season’s change with the best possible vision. For that reason, her practice at Park Ophthalmology is a natural choice for those needing anything from a prescription for new lenses to major eye surgery for glaucoma and cataracts.

Dr. Beth R. Friedland points out three benefits of becoming a patient at Park Ophthalmology:  

  • Range of services: Park Ophthalmology treats the youngest to the oldest patients, welcoming children getting their first exam to the elderly with specialized vision needs. Dr. Friedland not only provides prescriptions for vision correction, but also is an experienced surgeon, offering small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma surgery and laser surgery. She also provides emergency eye treatments for injuries.
  • Convenient locations: With two offices in the Triangle, patients can choose the location nearest their home or work. The Durham office is adjacent to Research Triangle Park while the Raleigh location is just minutes from downtown. Additionally, Dr. Friedland performs surgeries at several local hospitals including Rex Healthcare, Duke Health, Raleigh Hospital, Wake Medical Center North, Wake Medical Center Cary and NC Specialty Hospital.
  • Experience: Through her work as a clinical associate professor at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Dr. Friedland keeps current on the latest research and medical developments in eye health. Her interests include ocular gerontology (treatment of the elderly), pediatric ophthalmology (treatment of infants and children), occupational eye safety and laser eye safety.

Don’t miss North Carolina’s vibrant seasonal changes because of vision problems. Park Ophthalmology’s professional staff is ready to help you with all your vision needs. Call today for an appointment with Dr. Friedland.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

 

 

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4 Little-Known Facts about Human Tears and Eye Health, from Park Ophthalmology

“In the blink of an eye” means lightening quick! An interesting fact, humans blink from 15 to 20 times per minute, and a single blink lasts from one-tenth to four-tenths of a second. Those short moments are what keep eyes healthy and clean. When something goes wrong with tear production, the results can be dry, irritated eyes and blurry vision. Many Triangle residents have found help through Park Ophthalmology’s Dry Eye Clinic. Ophthalmologist Dr. Beth R. Friedland developed the clinic to help Triangle area patients who don’t produce enough natural tears.

These four interesting facts from Park Ophthalmology help patients understand the links between tears, blinking and their vision:  

  • Types of tears: Humans actually produce three different kind of tears: basal, emotional and reflex. A basal tear is the liquid that keeps eyes lubricated and clean. The cornea is flushed with fluid each time a person blinks, washing away bacteria and creating a smooth surface on the cornea. That smooth surface provides clearer vision and the lubricating quality of the tear prevents friction between the eyelid and cornea.
  • Tear composition: Tears are composed of water, fats, sugars and proteins, but tears produced for lubrication and cleansing are different from those produced for emotional crying. In fact, emotional tears contain stress hormones that are released through crying, allowing the person to feel calmer afterward.
  • Onions and tears: Cutting an onion often causes people to produce reflex tears. This is because the onion vapor is irritating and the body is attempting to remove the irritant. Tear gas, pepper spray, dust and allergens can have the same affect.
  • Help for dry eyes: Anyone suffering from dry eyes knows the irritation and soreness the condition creates. Over-the-counter artificial tears may help short term and wearing glasses or sunglasses could help reduce symptoms. However, Beth R. Friedland M.D. can provide a longer-term solution.

Park Ophthalmology’s Dry Eye Clinic offers help for those with dry eyes. Get relief from the irritation and vision problems caused by dry eyes. Call the office today to schedule an appointment. Dr. Friedland is currently accepting new patients.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

 

Posted in The Triangle's Eye Specialist | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

6 Important Tips for Eyeglass Care from Park Ophthalmology

Triangle residents who rely on eyeglasses for daily tasks wouldn’t dream of leaving home without their eyewear. After a complete eye exam, a new pair of glasses prescribed by Park Ophthalmology will bring everything into clearer focus. Daily care of those glasses ensures that patients enjoy sharp vision until time for a new prescription. Dr. Beth R. Friedland shares six important tips that keep glasses sparkling and free from damage. It is important to note that lenses should be washed daily to keep them free of dirt and oils.

Beth R. Friedland MD offers the following six practices that can extend eyewear life:   

  • Rinse: Glasses should always be rinsed with plain water before they are washed or wiped. Tiny specks of dust that settle on the lenses will scratch the surface if not first rinsed off.
  • Proper cleaner: Although they are made to clean glass, window cleaning solutions such as Windex can harm the protective coating on lenses. Use a drop of dish soap or a solution made exclusively for eyeglasses.
  • Air dry or use cotton cloth: Air drying is preferred, but a 100 % soft cotton cloth can be used to dry lenses. Any kind of tissue, paper towel or fabric that isn’t all cotton can scratch the lens surface.
  • Use the case: A hard-sided case is the best protection for storing glasses. It’s tempting to drop them into a shirt pocket or a purse, but this greatly increases the risk of scratches and even breakage.
  • Keep glasses face up: When placing glasses on a surface, such as a desk or table, rest them with the lenses up and the folded frame underneath. This protects the lenses from damage and dirt on the hard surface.
  • Protect the frames: Frames need to keep their alignment or lenses may not sit properly in front of the eyes. Propping glasses on the head can throw frames out of alignment. Using two hands to put on and take off glasses helps keep frames aligned.

Even with the best daily care, glasses cannot do their job if vision has changed. If it’s been a while since the last exam, contact Park Ophthalmology today to schedule an appointment. Dr. Friedland will get you seeing clearly again.

**

It’s back to school time and Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

 

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

Posted in Eye Care and Ophthalmology in the Triangle NC | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

6 Important Signs of School Age Vision Problems from Park Ophthalmology

Across the Raleigh-Durham area, children will be heading back to school at the end of August. Much of classroom learning requires good vision, and Park Ophthalmology wants all Triangle area students to succeed in school. Children may not know when their vision is a problem, but there are cues parents can watch for to see if their youngster needs vision screening. Dr. Beth R. Friedland has a particular interest in pediatric ophthalmology and her practice includes many young patients.

These six behavioral signs that might indicate the need for a youngster’s eye exam:  

  • Squinting: It’s natural to squint when attempting to bring images into focus. A child who consistently squints to see clearly should have his or her vision evaluated. It could indicate a need for eyeglasses.
  • Closing or covering one eye: A child who closes or covers one eye to watch television, use the computer or read could have one eye with better vision than the other. By blocking the signal from the weaker eye, the child is getting a clearer image.
  • Holding a book close to the face: Sitting extremely close to the computer screen or television, and bringing a book close to the face can mean a child cannot see clearly from further away. An eye exam will quickly determine whether it’s just habit or a need for glasses or contacts.
  • Using a finger while reading: While learning to read, many young children use their finger to follow along. However, as they get older, this habit should disappear. An older elementary child who needs a finger on the page or screen to keep his or her place may be compensating for vision problems.
  • Head tilting: Head tilting can reduce the effect of double vision, which can be a result of problems with the eye muscles. An eye exam is a good idea for any child who frequently tilts his or her head to focus intently.
  • Headaches or upset stomach: Vision problems can result in headaches, dizziness and nausea for children and adults. If other medical causes have been ruled out, a child who frequently complains of these kinds of symptoms may need to be seen by Dr. Friedland.

Park Ophthalmology serves patients of all ages. If you are concerned about your child’s vision, call the office today to schedule an exam. Beth R. Friedland M.D. will develop a treatment plan to help your child see clearly.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the children and vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice. Always consult a physician.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

Tags: Park Ophthalmology, Apex, Raleigh, Durham, Beth R. Friedland M.D., vision correction, eye glasses, Triangle, contact lenses, vision loss, vision correction, surgery, examination, eye health, North Carolina, squinting, nausea, dizziness, headaches, blurry vision, school work, children, color vision, eye vision, eye diseases, finding new eye doctor, new patients, children

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5 Critical Facts about Color Blindness from Park Ophthalmology

Color vision plays a critical role in how people experience the everyday  world, whether it’s selecting fruits at the weekly Raleigh Downtown Farmers Market, or enjoying one of the many summer outdoor movie events in the Triangle. It is important to note that a small percentage of our Triangle population misses out on many experiences because they are color blind. Color blindness (also called color vision deficiency) makes average daily tasks such as driving, using computers and cooking much more difficult. Some patients have been helped with special contact lenses or eyeglasses that allow them to see color. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology closely follows current research in Ophthalmology and her expertise brings the most current information and treatment to her patients.

Dr. Friedland offers five critical facts about color blindness:  

  • It is more common in men: Many more men than women are color blind. It is estimated that 1 in every 12 men and 1 in every 200 women are color blind.
  • It has a variety of causes: Color blindness is almost always hereditary, passed along from mother to son. It results when the color-receptors (cones) in the retina are either missing entirely or so few in number that it’s difficult to distinguish between red, green and blue. People are born color blind and the condition remains throughout life.
  • There are different types: There are different types of color blindness. Some people have less ability to see red; others have less ability to see green. Color blindness does not affect a person’s visual acuity.
  • It can affect children: It is important to check children for color blindness because the condition can affect their schoolwork. Color is used so frequently as part of the instruction in elementary school that color blind students will need extra help.
  • The diagnosis is straightforward: An ingenious method of testing for color blindness uses a selection of colored images. Hidden in the images are numbers or letters. Those with normal vision have no trouble seeing the number or letter. Doctors can determine what type of color blindness a person has by which images they are able to see on the test.

If color blindness is in the family, don’t put off having each child tested. Contact Park Ophthalmology today for an appointment and benefit from Dr. Friedland’s expertise in Pediatric Ophthalmology.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information about color blindness contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

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Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

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Photo: Pixabay

 

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