6 Important Signs of School Age Vision Problems from Park Ophthalmology

Across the Raleigh-Durham area, children will be heading back to school at the end of August. Much of classroom learning requires good vision, and Park Ophthalmology wants all Triangle area students to succeed in school. Children may not know when their vision is a problem, but there are cues parents can watch for to see if their youngster needs vision screening. Dr. Beth R. Friedland has a particular interest in pediatric ophthalmology and her practice includes many young patients.

These six behavioral signs that might indicate the need for a youngster’s eye exam:  

  • Squinting: It’s natural to squint when attempting to bring images into focus. A child who consistently squints to see clearly should have his or her vision evaluated. It could indicate a need for eyeglasses.
  • Closing or covering one eye: A child who closes or covers one eye to watch television, use the computer or read could have one eye with better vision than the other. By blocking the signal from the weaker eye, the child is getting a clearer image.
  • Holding a book close to the face: Sitting extremely close to the computer screen or television, and bringing a book close to the face can mean a child cannot see clearly from further away. An eye exam will quickly determine whether it’s just habit or a need for glasses or contacts.
  • Using a finger while reading: While learning to read, many young children use their finger to follow along. However, as they get older, this habit should disappear. An older elementary child who needs a finger on the page or screen to keep his or her place may be compensating for vision problems.
  • Head tilting: Head tilting can reduce the effect of double vision, which can be a result of problems with the eye muscles. An eye exam is a good idea for any child who frequently tilts his or her head to focus intently.
  • Headaches or upset stomach: Vision problems can result in headaches, dizziness and nausea for children and adults. If other medical causes have been ruled out, a child who frequently complains of these kinds of symptoms may need to be seen by Dr. Friedland.

Park Ophthalmology serves patients of all ages. If you are concerned about your child’s vision, call the office today to schedule an exam. Beth R. Friedland M.D. will develop a treatment plan to help your child see clearly.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the children and vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice. Always consult a physician.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

Tags: Park Ophthalmology, Apex, Raleigh, Durham, Beth R. Friedland M.D., vision correction, eye glasses, Triangle, contact lenses, vision loss, vision correction, surgery, examination, eye health, North Carolina, squinting, nausea, dizziness, headaches, blurry vision, school work, children, color vision, eye vision, eye diseases, finding new eye doctor, new patients, children

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5 Critical Facts about Color Blindness from Park Ophthalmology

Color vision plays a critical role in how people experience the everyday  world, whether it’s selecting fruits at the weekly Raleigh Downtown Farmers Market, or enjoying one of the many summer outdoor movie events in the Triangle. It is important to note that a small percentage of our Triangle population misses out on many experiences because they are color blind. Color blindness (also called color vision deficiency) makes average daily tasks such as driving, using computers and cooking much more difficult. Some patients have been helped with special contact lenses or eyeglasses that allow them to see color. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology closely follows current research in Ophthalmology and her expertise brings the most current information and treatment to her patients.

Dr. Friedland offers five critical facts about color blindness:  

  • It is more common in men: Many more men than women are color blind. It is estimated that 1 in every 12 men and 1 in every 200 women are color blind.
  • It has a variety of causes: Color blindness is almost always hereditary, passed along from mother to son. It results when the color-receptors (cones) in the retina are either missing entirely or so few in number that it’s difficult to distinguish between red, green and blue. People are born color blind and the condition remains throughout life.
  • There are different types: There are different types of color blindness. Some people have less ability to see red; others have less ability to see green. Color blindness does not affect a person’s visual acuity.
  • It can affect children: It is important to check children for color blindness because the condition can affect their schoolwork. Color is used so frequently as part of the instruction in elementary school that color blind students will need extra help.
  • The diagnosis is straightforward: An ingenious method of testing for color blindness uses a selection of colored images. Hidden in the images are numbers or letters. Those with normal vision have no trouble seeing the number or letter. Doctors can determine what type of color blindness a person has by which images they are able to see on the test.

If color blindness is in the family, don’t put off having each child tested. Contact Park Ophthalmology today for an appointment and benefit from Dr. Friedland’s expertise in Pediatric Ophthalmology.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information about color blindness contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

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5 Possible Causes of Blurry Vision from Park Ophthalmology

Blurry vision for some people is a daily occurrence until they put on glasses or contact lenses. And many Triangle residents only notice problems with focusing after a late night or during allergy season. Beth R. Friedland MD sees many patients who report blurred vision. Along with the professional and friendly staff at Park Ophthalmology, Dr. Friedland helps patients understand both the serious and less-serious reasons when they have trouble seeing.

Park Ophthalmology shares five common conditions that can cause blurry vision:

  • Nearsightedness: This is a common and easily remedied condition. People who are nearsighted have no trouble reading or doing close-up tasks, but may see road signs and distant landscapes as blurry. Often a new prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses is all that is needed.
  • Migraines: These incapacitating headaches affect about 12 percent of the population, including children, according to the Migraine Research Foundation. Besides the intense headache, blurry vision and sensitivity to light are two more migraine symptoms. Some migraine sufferers report a temporary partial loss of vision, flashes of light or seeing spots or wavy lines.
  • Psoriasis: Although known mostly as a skin disease, psoriasis raises the risk for uveitis. Uveitis is an inflammation of the eyeball that results in blurred vision. Vision patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis should alert their eye care professional to their diagnosis.
  • Allergies: Itchy, irritated, watery eyes can be signs of allergies. All of these conditions can contribute to blurry vision. Resolving the allergic reaction can also resolve the vision problem. Dr. Friedland will sort out the differences of allergic effects on the eyes that might also be more serious vision problems.
  • Lack of sleep: Failure to get adequate sleep can lead to blurry vision, itchiness, redness and sensitivity to light. Eyes need sufficient rest to work properly, including their ability to produce tears, which cleanse and lubricate the eyes. Blurry vision can result from inadequate tear production. Fortunately, the cure is simple: get more sleep.

Don’t put up with blurry vision. Make an appointment today with Dr. Beth Friedland to find out what’s interfering with eyesight. Park Ophthalmology, with offices in both Raleigh and Durham, serves all ages and is currently accepting new patients across the Triangle region.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eye wear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care and blurred vision is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice. Please consult a doctor in any situation.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

 

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6 Health Conditions Park Ophthalmology Eye Exams May Discover

Many Triangle residents postpone their annual eye exam because they haven’t noticed vision changes. However, an appointment with local Ophthalmologist Beth R. Friedland MD can reveal much more when examining eyes; even the simple things, like new contacts or eyeglasses. Ophthalmologists, like Dr. Friedland, are often the first medical professionals to see evidence of several serious health conditions. When patients make the time for an appointment, Park Ophthalmology will make that exam well worth it.

Doctor Friedland can note an array of information including six health conditions that can be discovered early during a comprehensive eye examination:

  • Autoimmune diseases: As Dr. Friedland examines the eyes, she looks for any signs of infection, and the presence of white blood cells. Symptoms of multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis may be spotted during an eye exam.
  • Thyroid disease: The thyroid gland, shaped like a butterfly and positioned at the front of the neck, regulates blood pressure, temperature, heart rate and food conversion to energy. Thyroid disease can reveal itself in puffy or protruding eyeballs.
  • Stroke: Several eye problems can indicate stroke. These include eye pain, blurry vision, headaches, vision loss or drooping eyelids. Dr. Friedland will examine the patient’s eye pressures, and look for bleeding in the retina or evidence of optic nerve swelling.
  • High blood pressure: The eye’s retina is rich with blood vessels and it can exhibit changes when a patient has high blood pressure. An eye exam provides an important way for the doctor to directly see the vessels and whether there are kinks, bends or tears that may indicate hypertension.
  • Diabetes: Loss of vision can be an early sign of diabetes. During the exam, the doctor will examine the retina for changes in the small blood vessels, bleeding or leakage of fluid, all possible indicators of diabetes.
  • Cancer: Two kinds of skin cancer may be detected during an eye exam: melanoma and basal cell carcinoma. Melanoma affects the cells that make color pigmentation in the eye. It is the most aggressive and fatal form of skin cancer and requires prompt treatment. Basal cell carcinoma may affect the eyelid and, if untreated, can spread to the brain via the eye.

We have two offices, Raleigh and Durham, so please do not put off an annual eye exam with Park Ophthalmology. Our friendly staff will be happy to schedule an appointment. Having peace of mind and healthy eyes makes it a win-win for every patient!

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article about the importance of eye exams is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology RTP

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay, tps dave

 

 

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5 Summer Tips to Remember When Choosing Sunglasses

Summer is right around the corner; Triangle residents are spending more time gardening, grilling, at the beach and other outdoor activities. With all that wonderful time out in the sunshine, it’s more important than ever to protect the eyes from sun damage. Long hours in the sun can often contribute to cataracts and cancer of the eye. Raleigh and Durham based Ophthalmologist Beth R. Friedland MD wants her patients to know that protecting their eyes doesn’t have to be difficult or expensive and begins with choosing the right pair of sunglasses.  Park Ophthalmology has compiled a short list of things to look for in eye protection.

Keep these five summer tips in mind when shopping for new sunglasses:

  • UV sticker: The most important job of sunglasses is blocking the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays. According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, sunglasses should be labeled with a tag or sticker that says “UV400” or “100% UV protection.”
  • Bigger is better: Wraparound sunglasses or those with over-sized lenses provide the most protection. Smaller lenses allow damaging light to enter from the sides.
  • Color: It’s easy to assume that darker lenses are better, but color and tint make no difference in UV protection. Athletes find that certain colors (amber, gray and green) provide more contrast and are useful when playing sports.
  • Polarization: Polarized lenses have a filter that reduces glare from reflective surfaces, making it easier to see while driving, boating or enjoying snow sports. However, polarization alone does not protect eyes from UV rays.
  • Cost: Price is not always an indication of quality when buying sunglasses. Lower cost options can work as well as designer-name styles if they provide 100 percent UV protection.

Do you need new prescription sunglasses? Talk to Dr. Friedland about every option. Call today to set up an appointment with Park Ophthalmology about any vision needs. The offices in Durham and Raleigh   serve all ages and both accept new patients.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the sunglasses and eye safety is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

 

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

 

Posted in Eye Care and Ophthalmology in the Triangle NC | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

4 Essential Nutrients That Contribute to Eye Health from Park Ophthalmology

Most Triangle residents have read that eating carrots is good for vision. Although that might sound like unscientific folk wisdom, carrots really do play an important part in maintaining eye health. Ophthalmologists in the Triangle like  Beth R. Friedland MD bring professional expertise to the treatment of eye diseases, yet patients also contribute by eating certain foods that may protect eyes from cataracts, age-related macular degeneration and diminished night vision.

The staff of Park Ophthalmology makes it a priority to educate patients on how to care for their vision. A diet rich in certain nutrients is just one additional way to help.

These four essential nutrients can play crucial roles in eye health:

  • Beta-carotene: Carrots are a rich source of beta-carotene, which the body converts to Vitamin A. Vitamin A helps the eye transmit light to the brain, allowing for better vision in low light conditions. Without sufficient Vitamin A, the corneas can dry out and become clouded. Retinas can also suffer damage without adequate Vitamin A.
  • Lutein and zeaxanthin: Found in eggs, green leafy vegetables and other green or yellow vegetables, these two nutrients protect the eyes by filtering out certain wave lengths of light. According to the American Optometric Association, lutein and zeaxanthin can help protect against age-related macular degeneration and cataracts.
  • Zinc: Zinc is an important chemical element that contributes to many positive health effects. In relation to vision, zinc helps the body move Vitamin A from the liver to the retina. The body must receive zinc either through supplements or food. It is found in seafood, poultry, red meat, eggs, tofu, beans and nuts.
  • Essential Fatty acids: Omega-3 fatty acids help the retina function and aid visual development in children. Insufficient omega-3 can contribute to dry eyes, age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Sources of omega-3 include fatty fish such as salmon, tuna and mackerel. To a lesser degree, omega-3 can be found in flaxseeds, chia seeds and winter squashes such as acorn, butternut and pumpkin.

Now, how do our Park Ophthalmology patients maintain eye health as they age? Contact Park Ophthalmology today and schedule an appointment with Beth R. Friedland M.D.

Dr. Friedland and our friendly and professional staff are available to answer questions about diet and vision on the first visit.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

 

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Six Health Revelations Discovered with Retinal Photography

The Triangle’s Beth R. Friedland MD uses the latest and most advanced tools to evaluate a patient’s visual acuity and general health during a thorough eye exam. One tool available is retinal photography, which takes a picture of the inside of the eye. The images produced can show whether a patient is developing vision problems, as can identify more general health concerns. These photographic images reveal a wealth of data even before the patient notices any problems.

Retinal photography gives Dr. Friedland information about these six important areas of discovery for eyes and general health:

  • Retinal health: On the retina photograph, the eye appears as an orange ball with blood vessels, a bright circle (optic disc) and a small darker spot (the macula). If the retina is detached or torn, it is easily clearly in the photo.
  • Macular degeneration: The macula, seen as a darker area in the photograph, provides central vision. Only through the use of retinal photography can the ophthalmologist see the physical damage caused by age-related macular degeneration.
  • Optic strokes: Every part of the body needs a constant supply of oxygenated blood. Eyes can be affected by stroke when blood flow is reduced or blocked. The clear images provided by retinal photos show where a stroke has occurred and the extent of the damage.
  • Blood vessel health: Radiating out from the optic disc are the eye’s blood vessels. When examining a retinal photograph, an ophthalmologist is looking for abnormal blood vessel growth, a dangerous build-up of blood, or anything else that can damage vision.
  • High blood pressure: Friedland may be the first doctor to diagnose a patient’s high blood pressure. Narrowing blood vessels, bleeding in the back of the eye or spots on the retina can all indicate high blood pressure.
  • Diabetes: Diabetes is a serious disease that eventually can cause blindness. As with high blood pressure, doctors examine retina photographs for changes in the blood vessels. Swelling or leakage and creation of new blood vessels can be signs of diabetes.

Retinal photographs provide a detailed view of the eye’s inner workings. If it’s been a while since you’ve had a comprehensive exam, contact Park Ophthalmology today to schedule an appointment with Beth R. Friedland, M.D.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained about retinal photography is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice. Please personally contact Park Ophthalmology with any medical concerns.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: IMUSM/swanson

Tags: Park Ophthalmology, Apex, Raleigh, Durham, Beth R. Friedland M.D., vision correction, eye glasses, Triangle, contact lenses, vision loss, vision correction, surgery, examination, eye health, North Carolina, near vision, eye stroke, diabetes, optic stroke, high blood pressure, retinal photography, dry eye, eye vision, eye diseases, finding new eye doctor, new patients, children

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4 Facts to Know About Near Vision Issues from Park Ophthalmology

After age 40, many people find it harder to see items and print up close. Individuals will often hold a book or newspaper at arm’s length to focus on what is needed. This very common condition, called Presbyopia, is a natural part of aging and it often sends people to the Triangle’s Park Ophthalmology for their first set of reading glasses or contact lenses. However, these same patients may have no need for distance correction; the same glasses which allow them to read can make distant objects appear blurry. Ophthalmologist Beth R. Friedland MD customizes treatment so that each patient receives vision correction that provides the best outcome for both good sight and health.

Here are four important facts to know about Presbyopia and its treatment:

  • It’s natural: Eyes age naturally. Presbyopia is Greek for “old eye.” The lens, which changes shape to focus on different distances, becomes less flexible with age. People who have never worn glasses find that after age 40, they need vision correction. Inexpensive, non-prescription “readers” from the local drugstore often provide help until the patient can see an eye care professional.
  • Single-vision lenses: A possible treatment for presbyopia is a prescription for single-vision eye glasses. Single vision means that the lenses provide the same magnification throughout. Although they correct near vision, single-vision lenses can cause distant objects to look distorted or blurry for those patients who retain good distance vision.
  • Progressive lenses: Progressive lenses have two or three different vision corrections in each lens. The top part of the lens provides distance correction, while the lower portion serves for near-vision. These lenses can solve the problem of having to change between distance and reading glasses. They are similar to bifocals, but their refraction changes gradually from bottom to top so no there is no visible line.
  • Contact lenses: There are multi-focal contact lenses on the market that provide correction for both near and close vision. Dr. Friedland will discuss whether contact lenses are suitable options for individual patients.

As patients age, they find close-up tasks challenging; it is time to contact Park Ophthalmology. Call Dr. Beth R. Friedland’s offices in Durham and Raleigh to take the first step in restoring near vision. New patients are currently being accepted at both of our convenient locations.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

We are the Triangle Eye Specialists!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay, 791440_ 640

 

 

Posted in The Triangle's Eye Specialist | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

4 Smartphone Habits for Triangle Eyes

Smartphones have made many aspects of life easier. We can search for directions, find a nearby restaurant or check in with the family. The steady convenience of a smartphone can often lead to overuse, which for many people can cause eye problems. Beth R. Friedland MD treats many patients in at Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle with complaints of eye strain, headaches, blurry vision and dry eyes. Although there are many reasons for these vision problems, smartphones are often to blame. No one needs to give up their smartphone to protect their eyes. Instead, Park Ophthalmology gives a few do’s and don’ts for smartphone users.

Practicing these four habits from Park Ophthalmology for smartphone users and eye health:

  • Take breaks: Reading text on a tiny screen causes eye strain and dry eye for some users. This happens because users don’t blink as often when staring at the phone. Some people squint to read the small type and tense their neck and shoulder muscles, causing stress and headaches. Eye health professionals recommend taking a break from the digital screen every 20 minutes.
  • Don’t read in bed: It’s tempting to check the latest sports scores or social media just before falling asleep, but resist the temptation. Some research has shown the light emitted from digital devices tends to keep people awake, even after they’ve turned off their devices. Powering down all electronics two hours before bed gives the brain and body the proper signals for sleep.
  • Enjoy the scenery: Constantly viewing anything at close range is strenuous for the eyes. It’s important to change the field of vision frequently to prevent eye strain. Look around the room, gaze out a window and allow the eyes to focus on something at least 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds.
  • Set limits: Instead of relying on the smartphone for constant communication and social media, create dedicated times to check email or messages. Power off the phone for meals, at social events and in the evening. After all, that adorable cat video will still be there tomorrow.

If smartphone use creating eye problems, call Park Ophthalmology today for an exam.  Dr. Beth R. Friedland will determine whether your phone or another condition is affecting your vision. Park Ophthalmology treats all ages and welcomes new patients.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

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4 Facts About Night Blindness, from Park Ophthalmology

The beginning of Daylight Saving Time was a welcome change to Triangle residents who enjoy more daylight hours in the evenings. It’s also helpful for those who find driving and other tasks more difficult at night. Beth R. Friedland MD knows that many factors can cause night blindness, which makes it hard for some patients to see their surroundings in dim light. Ophthalmologists call the condition Nyctalopia and it doesn’t mean complete blindness at night, but sometimes it can seem that way. In its continuing patient education series, Park Ophthalmology has compiled some key points about night blindness.

Park Ophthalmology assesses four important facts about the basics of night blindness:

  • Human vision: The human eye is essentially color blind in the dark, seeing only black, white and gray. All humans see less well in the dark than in bright light. In dim areas, movement is easier to see than stationary objects. It takes time for eyes to adjust from bright to low light, but those with night blindness take longer than normal to adjust.
  • Symptoms: One of the first signs people have of night blindness is trouble driving. They may also have trouble recognizing faces in a darkened setting, or navigating through a darkened room. Eyes can take up to 30 minutes to completely adjust to a darkened setting, but someone with night blindness may find even that interval isn’t enough for good vision.
  • Causes: Many different conditions contribute to night blindness. Some of those conditions include nearsightedness, medicine used to treat glaucoma, cataracts, diabetes, too little Vitamin A and keratoconus (steeply curved corneas).
  • Treatments: Depending on the cause, some night blindness can be treated. Cataract surgery can be helpful. A new prescription for contacts or eyeglasses may also make a difference. Only an Ophthalmologist can determine the cause and provide treatment.

Find out what’s causing your difficulty with night vision. Call Park Ophthalmology today for an exam with Dr. Beth R. Friedland to discuss your concerns about seeing in the dark.  Let Park Ophthalmology brighten your outlook with a comprehensive eye exam.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

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Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

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