4 Facts to Know About Near Vision Issues from Park Ophthalmology

After age 40, many people find it harder to see items and print up close. Individuals will often hold a book or newspaper at arm’s length to focus on what is needed. This very common condition, called Presbyopia, is a natural part of aging and it often sends people to the Triangle’s Park Ophthalmology for their first set of reading glasses or contact lenses. However, these same patients may have no need for distance correction; the same glasses which allow them to read can make distant objects appear blurry. Ophthalmologist Beth R. Friedland MD customizes treatment so that each patient receives vision correction that provides the best outcome for both good sight and health.

Here are four important facts to know about Presbyopia and its treatment:

  • It’s natural: Eyes age naturally. Presbyopia is Greek for “old eye.” The lens, which changes shape to focus on different distances, becomes less flexible with age. People who have never worn glasses find that after age 40, they need vision correction. Inexpensive, non-prescription “readers” from the local drugstore often provide help until the patient can see an eye care professional.
  • Single-vision lenses: A possible treatment for presbyopia is a prescription for single-vision eye glasses. Single vision means that the lenses provide the same magnification throughout. Although they correct near vision, single-vision lenses can cause distant objects to look distorted or blurry for those patients who retain good distance vision.
  • Progressive lenses: Progressive lenses have two or three different vision corrections in each lens. The top part of the lens provides distance correction, while the lower portion serves for near-vision. These lenses can solve the problem of having to change between distance and reading glasses. They are similar to bifocals, but their refraction changes gradually from bottom to top so no there is no visible line.
  • Contact lenses: There are multi-focal contact lenses on the market that provide correction for both near and close vision. Dr. Friedland will discuss whether contact lenses are suitable options for individual patients.

As patients age, they find close-up tasks challenging; it is time to contact Park Ophthalmology. Call Dr. Beth R. Friedland’s offices in Durham and Raleigh to take the first step in restoring near vision. New patients are currently being accepted at both of our convenient locations.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

We are the Triangle Eye Specialists!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay, 791440_ 640

 

 

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4 Smartphone Habits for Triangle Eyes

Smartphones have made many aspects of life easier. We can search for directions, find a nearby restaurant or check in with the family. The steady convenience of a smartphone can often lead to overuse, which for many people can cause eye problems. Beth R. Friedland MD treats many patients in at Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle with complaints of eye strain, headaches, blurry vision and dry eyes. Although there are many reasons for these vision problems, smartphones are often to blame. No one needs to give up their smartphone to protect their eyes. Instead, Park Ophthalmology gives a few do’s and don’ts for smartphone users.

Practicing these four habits from Park Ophthalmology for smartphone users and eye health:

  • Take breaks: Reading text on a tiny screen causes eye strain and dry eye for some users. This happens because users don’t blink as often when staring at the phone. Some people squint to read the small type and tense their neck and shoulder muscles, causing stress and headaches. Eye health professionals recommend taking a break from the digital screen every 20 minutes.
  • Don’t read in bed: It’s tempting to check the latest sports scores or social media just before falling asleep, but resist the temptation. Some research has shown the light emitted from digital devices tends to keep people awake, even after they’ve turned off their devices. Powering down all electronics two hours before bed gives the brain and body the proper signals for sleep.
  • Enjoy the scenery: Constantly viewing anything at close range is strenuous for the eyes. It’s important to change the field of vision frequently to prevent eye strain. Look around the room, gaze out a window and allow the eyes to focus on something at least 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds.
  • Set limits: Instead of relying on the smartphone for constant communication and social media, create dedicated times to check email or messages. Power off the phone for meals, at social events and in the evening. After all, that adorable cat video will still be there tomorrow.

If smartphone use creating eye problems, call Park Ophthalmology today for an exam.  Dr. Beth R. Friedland will determine whether your phone or another condition is affecting your vision. Park Ophthalmology treats all ages and welcomes new patients.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

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4 Facts About Night Blindness, from Park Ophthalmology

The beginning of Daylight Saving Time was a welcome change to Triangle residents who enjoy more daylight hours in the evenings. It’s also helpful for those who find driving and other tasks more difficult at night. Beth R. Friedland MD knows that many factors can cause night blindness, which makes it hard for some patients to see their surroundings in dim light. Ophthalmologists call the condition Nyctalopia and it doesn’t mean complete blindness at night, but sometimes it can seem that way. In its continuing patient education series, Park Ophthalmology has compiled some key points about night blindness.

Park Ophthalmology assesses four important facts about the basics of night blindness:

  • Human vision: The human eye is essentially color blind in the dark, seeing only black, white and gray. All humans see less well in the dark than in bright light. In dim areas, movement is easier to see than stationary objects. It takes time for eyes to adjust from bright to low light, but those with night blindness take longer than normal to adjust.
  • Symptoms: One of the first signs people have of night blindness is trouble driving. They may also have trouble recognizing faces in a darkened setting, or navigating through a darkened room. Eyes can take up to 30 minutes to completely adjust to a darkened setting, but someone with night blindness may find even that interval isn’t enough for good vision.
  • Causes: Many different conditions contribute to night blindness. Some of those conditions include nearsightedness, medicine used to treat glaucoma, cataracts, diabetes, too little Vitamin A and keratoconus (steeply curved corneas).
  • Treatments: Depending on the cause, some night blindness can be treated. Cataract surgery can be helpful. A new prescription for contacts or eyeglasses may also make a difference. Only an Ophthalmologist can determine the cause and provide treatment.

Find out what’s causing your difficulty with night vision. Call Park Ophthalmology today for an exam with Dr. Beth R. Friedland to discuss your concerns about seeing in the dark.  Let Park Ophthalmology brighten your outlook with a comprehensive eye exam.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Pixabay

 

 

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5 Critical Links with Eyes, Lifestyle, and General Health, from Park Ophthalmology

Beth R. Friedland M.D., of Park Ophthalmology, has known for a long time that vision can be affected by bodily diseases, a sedentary lifestyle, and unhealthy eating and drinking.  Researchers have explored links between high cholesterol, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, elevated blood pressure and vision changes. This is the reason patients are asked to provide medical information about other conditions when they visit Beth R. Friedland MD of Park Ophthalmology. Changes in medications or general health should be reported to Dr. Friedland at the next exam.

Every Triangle resident needs to know these five critical links with eye and general health:

  • Heart disease: The American Academy of Ophthalmology reports that blood vessels in both the eyes and the heart can show similar blockages. The effects for vision include age-related macular degeneration, blockage in retinal vessels, cataracts and glaucoma.
  • High blood pressure: If left untreated, high blood pressure can damage the brain’s blood vessels, causing them to leak or rupture, which results in stroke. The first sign of a stroke can be the loss of a part of the visual field, especially to one side.
  • Diabetes: Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness among working-age Americans. The disease affects the eye’s retina, weakening tiny blood vessels until they burst and leak. As with high blood pressure, uncontrolled diabetes causes significant damage to vision.
  • Risky habits: Some habits contribute to diseases that affect both vision and general health. In particular, cigarette smoking, obesity and poor eating habits contribute to problems with the eyes as well as the heart and blood vessels.
  • Helpful habits: To prevent diseases that damage vision, Triangle residents can implement some lifestyle changes such as getting more exercise, losing weight, and adding foods such as kale, spinach, salmon and tuna to their diets. Keeping regular appointments with Dr. Friedland and a primary care physician ensures that problems are diagnosed and treated promptly.

If anyone in the Triangle has recently been diagnosed with hypertension, heart disease or diabetes, call Park Ophthalmology to schedule a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Friedland. If you are looking for a new Ophthalmologist, our offices in Durham and in Raleigh are currently accepting new patients. Contact us at 919 544 5375.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care and general health is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Ambro/Freedigitalphotos.net

 

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5 Tips to Help Triangle Patients Effectively Use Eye Drops

In many cases, certain eye conditions require our Park Ophthalmology patients to use eye drops for a period of time. Dry, itchy or irritated eyes can also be relieved by the use of drops that Dr. Beth R. Friedland prescribes or recommends. For example, eye infections often require treatment with medicated drops prescribed by Beth R. Friedland MD of Park Ophthalmology.

The Doctor understands that people are uncomfortable with using eye drops, and sometimes it is hard to tell whether the drops have been administered the effective way. Dr. Friedland and her professional staff can always demonstrate the best way for patients to use drops safely and effectively if needed.

Park Ophthalmology offers five simple suggestions make eye drops easier and more effective to use:

  • Keep everything clean: Always wash hands before using eye drops and make sure the tip of the bottle doesn’t touch the eye, the eyelids or anything else. This precaution protects the bottle and its contents from contamination.
  • Pull down lower eyelid: Use the index finger on one hand to pull down the lower eyelid so it creates a cupped area for the eye drop. Steady the hand with the dropper on the hand pulling down the eyelid, tilt head back and gently squeeze dropper until one drop falls into the eyelid “cup.” This is easier than trying to drop the liquid right onto the eye itself.
  • Rest the eyes: Close the eye to allow liquid to bathe the affected eye. If a second drop is prescribed, wait a few minutes to make sure it doesn’t wash away the first drop.
  • Refrigerate the eye drops: It sounds like a strange suggestion, but when the drops are cool, it’s easier to know that they’ve actually made it into the eye.
  • Ask for guidance: Triangle area patients can always ask a family member to help them. Once they get comfortable with the sensation of drops going into the eye, patients will usually find it easier to take over the task themselves.

It’s always best to check with Dr. Friedland before using any over-the-counter eye drops. If patients are  experiencing red, irritated eyes or think there is the chance of an eye infection, don’t delay treatment. Call Park Ophthalmology immediately to schedule an exam.

Our offices in Durham and Raleigh welcome new patients.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eye wear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice. Always consult a doctor.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: pixabay

 

 

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8 Signs that an Eye Exam is Needed from Park Ophthalmology

Vision changes can happen so gradually that it isn’t surprising that many Triangle residents don’t schedule an eye exam until they have trouble reading road signs or a computer screen. Although the main reason to see an eye specialist might be for new glasses or contacts, but there are several other reasons. Many situations demand evaluation by the Triangle’s Beth R. Friedland MD. With offices at Park Ophthalmology in Raleigh and Durham, Dr. Friedland and her team provide comprehensive care for every all aspects of eye health, from vision correction through eye surgery.

Park Ophthalmology offers eight important reasons to get an eye exam:

  • Time since last exam: If it’s been more than a year, it’s time for a new eye exam. Exams can reveal underlying, undiagnosed health conditions such as diabetes or cancer, and provide early warning signs of heart disease and stroke.
  • Night vision worries: Driving at night is difficult for many people, especially as they age. Only an eye health professional can assess what is causing the problem and provide corrective treatment.
  • Medical conditions: Those with a family history of diabetes or glaucoma need to be vigilant about regular eye exams.
  • Red, itchy, dry eyes: It’s annoying to have eyes that are constantly dry, red or itchy. Patients at Park Ophthalmology’s Dry Eye Clinic get relief from those symptoms with a 12-minute in-office treatment.
  • Getting older: Anyone over 40 needs to have at least a baseline eye examination. Eyes don’t work as well with we age.
  • Computer strain: Viewing a computer, tablet or phone screen for extended periods can cause eye strain, marked by headaches or blurred vision. See Dr. Friedland to determine whether online work is the cause.
  • Dizziness: Vision plays an important role in maintaining balance. Motion sickness and dizziness could indicate vision problems.
  • Trouble reading: Holding reading material further away to see it clearly is another sign that vision correction could be needed.

Don’t put off that important yearly exam. Contact the friendly, professional staff at Park Ophthalmology and schedule a complete eye exam. Park Ophthalmology is currently accepting new patients from across the Triangle.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: pixabay

 

 

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4 Important Points that Help Triangle Patients Understand Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a devious eye disease that does much of its damage before the patient notices vision loss. However, with early diagnosis, patients can begin treatments to manage the disease. The Triangle area is fortunate to have Ophthalmologist Dr. Beth R. Friedland, who takes a special interest in the treatment of Glaucoma.

January is Glaucoma Awareness Month so Park Ophthalmology in Durham and Raleigh wants to share important facts about this serious eye condition.

The Park Ophthalmology Team offers four important points to help everyone to better understand Glaucoma:

  • By the numbers: The American Academy of Ophthalmology estimates that more than three million Americans have glaucoma, but only half of them are aware of it. In the United States, it is the fourth leading cause of vision loss, after age-related macular degeneration, cataracts and diabetic retinopathy.
  • Optic nerve damage: Glaucoma damages the optic nerve at the back of the eye. This nerve transmits images to the brain, creating vision. With Glaucoma, irreversible damage can occur before the patient is aware of sight loss. It is sometimes called the “sneak thief of sight.”
  • Eye pressures: The common cause of glaucoma is a rise in internal eye pressure, which damages the optic nerve. Eyes need the right amount of fluid pressure to retain their shape, but sometimes the eyes produce too much or drainage routes become obstructed. Once diagnosed, patients must have their eye pressures monitored closely by Dr. Friedland.
  • Two types: There are two types of Glaucoma – narrow-angle and primary open-angle – and patients experience them in different ways. Narrow-angle Glaucoma often occurs suddenly and causes eye pain, vision loss, nausea or halos, symptoms that prompt patients to see an ophthalmologist. By contrast, primary open-angle Glaucoma develops slowly with no obvious symptoms. Patients’ first awareness of a problem likely will be a loss of peripheral vision.

Checking eye pressure is a routine part of an eye exam at Park Ophthalmology. Call our office today to schedule an appointment with Beth R. Friedland MD. Park Ophthalmology treats all ages and is accepting new patients in both Durham and Raleigh.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: 79585, pixabay

 

 

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5 Facts the Triangle Needs to Know about Winter Eye Health

The Triangle has certainly gotten its share of snow and cold temperatures in the past week, making for treacherous roads and school closings. What isn’t so obvious is that cold and snow present special challenges for eye health. On the Park Ophthalmology Facebook page, Dr. Beth R. Friedland shared a recent post about snow blindness, a condition caused by exposure to UV rays reflecting off snow and ice. Although it might seem strange to wear sunglasses during winter, they are the first line of protection against snow blindness.

Five facts to know about winter and eye health, provided by the American Academy of Ophthalmology:

  • UV rays and reflection: Snow blindness, called photokeratitis, happens when eyes are exposed to ultraviolet radiation. The reflective qualities of snow and ice increase UV radiation exposure, which is why sunglasses and snow goggles for sports are winter necessities.
  • Similar to sunburn: Just as a sunburn isn’t obvious while it’s happening, snow blindness symptoms often occur after damage has been done. But instead of the skin, the burn happens to the cornea (clear cover at the front of the eye) and conjunctiva (a layer over the eyelids and whites of the eye).
  • Common symptoms: Although infrequent, some people may experience temporary vision loss from snow blindness. More common symptoms include pain, redness, blurry vision, tearing, sensitivity to bright light or headaches.
  • Getting diagnosed: Patients who experience any of the above symptoms or who have recently spent significant time in the outdoors, should contact Beth R. Friedland M.D. The doctor will examine the patient’s eyes and use a dye to check for UV damage.
  • Treatment: Snow blindness usually clears up on its own with time. Contact lens wearers should remove lenses. Doctor Friedland can recommend the best pain reliever and whether eye drops are necessary.

Get out and have fun during the Triangle winter, just remember to protect your eyes from UV radiation. Contact Park Ophthalmology with any questions if experiencing problems. New patients are welcome.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eye wear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: sweden, pixabay

 

 

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4 Important Indicators of Senior Vision Problems

park-12-19-16-id-100412598-radnattPeople across the Triangle expect their bodies to change with age. There is also a decline in vision, and it is common in those patients older than 60. Although vision loss is a normal part of the aging process, some vision issues can and should be paid attention to if they happen.

In the Raleigh-Durham area, seniors rely on Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology to provide not only routine care, but to discover any hidden health issues and arrange the effective treatment. Patients should be aware that sudden vision changes require an immediate exam from Dr. Friedland or their eye doctor.

Park Ophthalmology shares four vision conditions that need swift medical attention:

  • Double vision: A sudden occurrence of double vision can be serious. Some underlying causes of double vision are strokes, aneurysms and brain swelling. There are many benign causes of double vision as well, but older patients should seek medical attention immediately if they are suddenly seeing double.
  • Blurry vision: When only one eye delivers a blurry image, older patients should be concerned. Those over 60 are at a greater risk of developing a hole in the retina, which results in the blurriness. Prompt treatment from an eye care professional such as Dr. Friedland is necessary to prevent permanent vision loss.
  • Spots and floaters: Eye floaters usually aren’t serious. They are caused when bits of the eye’s vitreous liquid break loose and float inside the eye, sometimes crossing within a person’s vision. If floaters or spots occur suddenly, the cause could be a tear or detachment of the retina. This condition needs to be treated immediately or serious damage can occur.
  • Pain, redness, nausea: Older adults are already at an increased risk for glaucoma, a sight-stealing condition related to pressures within the eye. Although glaucoma usually develops gradually and without noticeable symptoms, narrow-angle glaucoma often manifests with eye pain and redness, plus nausea and vomiting. This condition can quickly cause permanent vision damage. Patients should see Dr. Friedland immediately if they have this combination of symptoms.

Maintaining eye health into the senior years requires attention to these four serious conditions and other potential vision problems. If anyone reading this post is experiencing any worrisome vision problems, call Park Ophthalmology today for an appointment with Beth. R. Friedland, M.D.

To all of our friends and patients, Merry Christmas and Happy Hanukkah to all!

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for your eyes and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: radnatt/freedigitalphotos.net

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4 Surprising Facts about Sports-Related Eye Injuries

park-12-5-16-pixabay-534507_640In North Carolina, 4,000 school children suffer eye injuries every year according to the National Society to Prevent Blindness. As an Ophthalmologist in the Triangle, Dr. Beth R. Friedland treats many of those injuries. Sports account for the vast majority of eye injuries in children and most of those are preventable if the proper eyewear is used, reports the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Park Ophthalmology staff and Beth R. Friedland M.D. always strive to educate children and their parents about ways to stay safe while playing their favorite sports.

From Park Ophthalmology in Durham and Raleigh, our staff offers four surprising facts about sports and eye injuries in children:

  • Baseball: America’s Past Time accounts for more eye injuries in children aged 5 to 14 than any other sport. Getting hit in or near the eye by a bat or ball can injure the eyeball, the bones around the eye or the retina. Protective goggles for children who play baseball are now on the market. Concerned parents are encouraged to seek advice from Dr. Friedland.
  • Radiation injuries: The sun’s ultraviolet light poses significant threat to the human eye. Accumulated exposure over many years increases the risk of vision loss later in life. It’s never too early to start practicing good eye health for children as well as adults. In particular, children involved in water or snow sports need goggles to protect their eyes from UV rays.
  • Paintball: Paintball’s growing popularity has been accompanied by a rise in serious eye injuries. The high-velocity paintballs can cause traumatic injuries to the eyes if proper protection isn’t worn. Proper adult supervision is necessary and youngsters need to always use eye protection during paintball games.
  • Basketball: Along with baseball, basketball is also a high-risk sport. Youngsters 15 and older are more likely to sustain eye injuries in basketball than in any other sport. Polycarbonate protective lenses are recommended by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Eye protection should be considered as part of the uniform when a child suits up for a game.

Young athletes can prevent eye injuries by using protective eyewear. Schedule an appointment today with Dr. Friedland at Park Ophthalmology to make sure your youngster is ready to compete.

Happy Hanukkah and Merry Christmas to all!

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

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Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

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